El Dorado County VHR Update

VHR NEWS

El Dorado County recently announced that any vacation home rental found to be operating without a permit will not be permitted to obtain a permit until all past due transient occupancy taxes, penalties and interest are paid in full and will be precluded from applying for a vacation home rental permit or from being added to the waiting list for a one year period.

Renewals of existing permitted vacation home rentals in the Tahoe Basin, for which a vacation rental permit was granted based on an application submitted on or before November 1, 2020, shall not be limited based on the cap requirements.
An application to renew a permit for a vacation rental shall be submitted no sooner than 180 days before the expiration date of the existing permit, and no later than the date of expiration of that permit. Upon receipt of a complete application, the expiration of the existing permit shall be stayed until final action is taken on the renewal application.

Children five years of age or younger are not counted towards the occupancy limits. Occupancy may be lowered pursuant to the outcome of the fire and life safety inspection.

A bedroom shall only be recognized as such for purposes of this ordinance if it has been approved and inspected by the Building Official, and can be verified by
reference to the Assessor’s office.

Skyland Update

Skyland

Skyland is one of the few neighborhoods on the Nevada East Shore to have not sold as many properties as the previous year.  In 2019 and 2020 there were a total of 11 sales each year.  One of the predominant changes thus far in 2020 has been the reduction in the total average days on market to sell a property. 2020 saw days reduced from 185 in 2019 to 97 this year.  Homeowners will be happy to know the median average sales price has increased 5.6% from $1,197,000 in 2019 to $1,265,000 this year.  

Nevada Open Houses

NV Assoc of Realtors

Nevada’s Governor announced a plan to commence all in-person showings and open houses of single family and multi-family residences currently occupied and on the market for sale, effective at 12:01 a.m. on October 1, subject to the following limitations:

  1. Showings and open houses of properties may not take place with the occupant present.
  2. Showings of properties are limited to one prospective buyer and one real estate professional for both the seller and prospective buyer at a time. For the purposes of this provision, “a prospective buyer” includes the buyer and the buyer’s spouse, domestic partner, business partner, or family members.
  3. Sellers conducting an open house are responsible for ensuring that there will not be more than one prospective buyer viewing a property at any given time. This may require having an individual present to properly meter prospective buyers entering an open house.
  4. Sellers are encouraged to utilize appointments for in-person showings and open houses to the greatest extent practicable.
  5. Real estate professionals are encouraged to utilize three-dimensional interactive property scans, virtual tours, and virtual staging to the greatest extent possible.
  6. Real estate professionals are encouraged to avoid in-person transactions and services to the greatest extent practicable.
  7. Real estate professionals must require all participants at in-person showings and open houses to wear face coverings at all times pursuant to Directive 024 and must follow CDC guidelines for in-person showings and open houses.
    Some additional guidelines recommended by the CDC and Nevada REALTORS® are as follows:
    • All visitors maintain 6ft;
    • Real estate professionals have available gloves and hand sanitizer for use and remind clients to not touch surfaces when viewing property as well as wipe down surfaces as frequently as possible.

C.A.R. Legal Guidance on Open Houses – as of 7/2/20

Coronavirus

There still seems to be some confusion in the state regarding the legality of holding open houses, says the California Association of Realtors (C.A.R.). Please be reminded that open houses are not currently permitted in California. The mandatory Industry Guidance states “Discontinue holding open houses and showings open to the general public on a walk-in basis; use an appointment or digital sign-in process to control the number of people in the house or property.” Thus, the only way to show property is by making an appointment in advance. Visitors viewing a house should be from one buying party only and the number of persons in the property is limited by the requirement of social distancing. In addition, the property must be thoroughly cleaned before and after each showing.


Open houses are generally understood to be on a walk-in basis without needing an appointment. Appointment-based showings are not “open houses” in the general understanding of the industry and the public. Therefore, to present a true picture under Article 12 of the Code of Ethics, REALTORS® should conform to the normal understanding of the term.


In other words, REALTORS® should not be putting up Open House signs at all, because if they are advertising a traditional open house they are promoting an unlawful activity, and if they are advertising an “open house” that really isn’t an open house, they are arguably not presenting a true picture in their advertising.

Showing Requirements during Covid

I wanted to provide a quick update to let you know how things are changing and adjusting – again.  Hopefully some of these changes will make things easier on you.
Last week, the state of California issued guidance (new law) for showing practices during the pandemic in coordination with Cal Osha and the Department of Public Health.  For the most part, they adopted the California Association of REALTORS (C.A.R.’s) Best Practices with some changes.
All Brokers must have a plan and rules for showing property.  To satisfy the state requirement:
1-The Best Practices are no longer a recommendation, they are now law and required.  C.A.R. is updating them to include everything that the state added in their last update.  These will be considered “the plan.”
2-The PEAD form (Coronavirus Property Entry Advisory and Declaration) will be updated and split into 2 separate forms – one for the occupants to sign and one for those who will enter the property.  This will be considered “the rules.”
3-Listing agents must post a blank copy of the PEAD form (rules) and a pictogram (above) at the entrance of the property.
The pictogram is also being revised.  Gloves and booties will no longer be required to be worn by everyone entering the property, but they must sanitize hands prior to entering or wash hands immediately after entering, and the seller must provide either the sanitizer or a wash station in the home for this purpose.  The seller (or listing agent) must also provide masks and sanitizing wipes (for cleaning after the showing).  Although gloves and booties are not required, masks still are, and while the hope is that people have their own masks, they may not enter listing properties if they don’t have one.
With the new regulations by the state, agents are also responsible for “thorough cleaning and disinfecting between showings.”  C.A.R. was able to have language removed from the law that also would have required period deep cleaning of the listing properties.  It is unclear who is required to do the cleaning, but it is most likely the showing agent(s) as the occupants of the home and the listing agent(s) is/are not present during and immediately after showings.
If you are conducting “open houses by appointment” agents will need to adjust the appointment times to allow for the thorough cleaning and disinfection in between each showing.
C.A.R. hopes to send out the revised Best Practices, PEAD forms and pictogram to all members later this week. 

Can I Buy or Sell a House During the Coronavirus Pandemic?

Coronavirus

As spring homebuying season approached this year, Mike and Tammy York of Lompoc, California, listed their house for sale and started looking for a home to buy in Bakersfield, California, where they want to retire.

But then the coronavirus outbreak called everything into question. When the governor of California issued a statewide stay-at-home order March 19, the York’s wondered if they were stuck.

“We thought, ‘Now what are we going to do?'” Mike York says.

Welcome to today’s real estate market, where many ask if it’s still possible to buy or sell. As the Yorks have found, the answer is yes, though the process includes some new challenges.

“There are people out there buying and selling real estate,” says Jeanne Radsick, president of the California Association of Realtors and a real estate agent with Century 21 Jordan-Link & Co. in Bakersfield. “But it’s not just business-as-usual.”

Government social distancing regulations vary by state, county and city. Some states never instituted stay-at-home orders. Others plan to reopen soon, and still others have not set a date to end strict shelter-in-place requirements. Rules about whether real estate is an essential service during a stay-at-home order also vary.

If, like the York’s, you want to sell or buy a home despite the pandemic, here are some of the things you may encounter.

About the author: Barbara Marquand writes about homeownership and mortgages, and is NerdWallet’s authority on insurance.